A.M. Klein and Mordecai Richler : Canadian Responses to the Holocaust

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
A.M. Klein and Mordecai Richler : Canadian Responses to the Holocaust
Abstract
The author notes that second-generation Montreal Jewish writers have manifested preoccupation with recent history of Jewish victimization. Their direct experience of anti-Semitism in the 1930s and 1940s enhanced the sense of identification with the Holocaust. She explains that A.M. Klein’s and Mordecai Richler’s response to Jewish suffering reveals a continuum marked by gradual progression towards loss of hope in humanistic ideals. Klein, despite increasing disillusion, perceives the birth of the Jewish State as the symbol of moral rebirth in the wake of the European tragedy; Richler, despite his humanist liberal sympathies, sees the State of Israel as a deterrent of another outburst of anti-Jewish hatred. The author argues that the consciousness of the fascist threat in Quebec has placed the nightmare of another Holocaust in the context of likelihood.
Publication
Journal of Canadian Studies / Revue d'études canadiennes
Volume
Vol. 24
Issue
no. 2
Pages
65-77
Date
Summer 1989
Language
en
Citation
Brenner, Rachel Feldhay. “A.M. Klein and Mordecai Richler : Canadian Responses to the Holocaust.” Journal of Canadian Studies / Revue d’études canadiennes Vol. 24, no. 2 (Summer 1989): 65–77.
Find in a library
Permalink