Architecture, Religion and Tuberculosis in Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, Quebec

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
Architecture, Religion and Tuberculosis in Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, Quebec
Abstract
The authors explore the architecture of the Mount Sinai Sanatorium in Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts to disentangle the role of religion in the treatment of tuberculosis. In particular, they analyze the design of Mount Sinai, the jewel in the crown of Jewish philanthrophy in Montreal, in relation to that of the nearby Laurentian Sanatorium. While Mount Sinai offered free treatment to the poor in a stunning, Art Deco building of 1930, the Protestant hospital had by then served paying patients for more than two decades in a purposefully home-like, Tudor-revival setting. The authors show how the two hospitals differed in terms of their relationship to site, access and, most importantly, to city, knowledge, and community.
Publication
Scientia Canadensis
Volume
Vol. 32
Issue
no. 1
Pages
1-19
Date
2009
Language
en
Citation
Adams, Annmarie, and Mary Anne Poutanen. “Architecture, Religion and Tuberculosis in Sainte-Agathe-Des-Monts, Quebec.” Scientia Canadensis Vol. 32, no. 1 (2009): 1–19.
Find in a library
Permalink