Horses, Hedges, and Hegemony: Foxhunting in the Countryside

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
Horses, Hedges, and Hegemony: Foxhunting in the Countryside
Abstract
The reaction of the Montreal Hunt, Canada's most prominent foxhunting club and a bastion of that city's Anglo Protestant elite, to the curtailing of foxhunting by the provincial government in the 1890s. In January 1897, the Quebec government passed legislation under the province's fish and game laws making it illegal "to hunt, kill, or take" foxes between April 1 and November 1. However, the author argues, Montreal's foxhunters were above the law. He examines the relationship between rural farmers who allowed the hunt on their land and this urban elite who negotiated their right of passage across rural property. Foxhunting, the author maintains, was an expression of power, identity, and hegemony on the part of a relatively small segment of society fluent in both the urban and the rural world of nineteenth century Montreal.
Book Title
Metropolitan Natures: Environmental Histories of Montreal
Place
Pittsburgh, PA
Publisher
University of Pittsburgh Press
Date
2011
Pages
211-227
Language
en
Citation
Ingram, Darcy. “Horses, Hedges, and Hegemony: Foxhunting in the Countryside.” In Metropolitan Natures: Environmental Histories of Montreal, edited by Stéphane Castonguay and Michèle Dagenais, 211–227. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011.
Find in a library
Permalink