Taking to the Streets: Crowds, Politics and Identity in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Montreal

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Taking to the Streets: Crowds, Politics and Identity in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Montreal
Abstract
An examination of public life in Montreal in the 1840s. The author looks at a diverse set of crowd events, including riots, parades, religious processions, and public celebrations, as a means of exploring how the men and women of Montreal engaged in politics and aspects of public life during this decade. The author argues that engaging in crowd events provided Montrealers from across the class and ethnic divide an opportunity to negotiate their place in a city undergoing significant cultural and demographic change.For ambitious elites, organizing events like religious processions and national society parades was a means of asserting a claim on cultural power, while for others these moments provided a space for leisure, resistance and transgression.
Type
PhD dissertation
University
York University
Place
Toronto, ON
Date
2010
Language
en
Citation
Horner, Dan. “Taking to the Streets: Crowds, Politics and Identity in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Montreal.” PhD dissertation, York University, 2010.
Find in a library
Permalink