Thirty Years After Bill 101: A Contemporary Perspective on Attitudes Towards English and French in Montreal

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Thirty Years After Bill 101: A Contemporary Perspective on Attitudes Towards English and French in Montreal
Abstract
The author presents a 2007 study that was conducted amongst 147 young Anglophone, Francophone and Allophone Montrealers in order to shed light on their attitudes towards English and French in terms of status and solidarity. Her findings indicate that while a certain amount of status was attributed to French, most likely as a result of language policy and planning measures such as Bill 101, significantly more status was attributed to English — most likely a result of the utilitarian value that the language holds as the global lingua franca. Regarding the solidarity dimension, the author discovered that while the respondents recognised the social desirability of having an affective attachment to the French language, at a more private level, they held more positive attitudes towards English. She concludes that these can tentatively be explained in terms of the respondents' social identity.
Publication
Canadian Journal of Applied Linguistics/Revue canadienne de linguistique appliquée
Volume
Vol. 17
Issue
no. 1
Pages
20-50
Date
2014
Language
en
Citation
Kircher, Ruth. “Thirty Years After Bill 101: A Contemporary Perspective on Attitudes Towards English and French in Montreal.” Canadian Journal of Applied Linguistics/Revue canadienne de linguistique appliquée Vol. 17, no. 1 (2014): 20–50.
Find in a library
Permalink