'Maîtres chez eux' : La grève des internes de 1934 revisitée

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
'Maîtres chez eux' : La grève des internes de 1934 revisitée
Abstract
One of the most iconic events in the history of anti-Semitism in Quebec was the 1934 strike by interns at Montreal's Notre-Dame Hospital, the first medical strike in Canada. The interns were opposed to the presence of a Jewish physician, Dr. Samuel Rabinovitch (1901-2010), as a senior intern. Rabinovitch was the first Jew to earn a staff position at a Quebec Catholic hospital. The author examines both archival sources and commentary in the contemporary press to arrive at a better understanding of the event from multiple perspectives, namely those of the Jewish community, French Canadian leaders (at the hospital, at the Université de Montréal, and within the Catholic Church), members of the wider French Quebec community, and English language media. Rabinovitch had graduated at the top of his class from Université de Montréal; the striking interns demanded that a French-Canadian fill the post. When the hospital's medical board refused to remove Rabinovitch, the interns went on a four-day strike. The strike spread to four other hospitals, bringing to seventy-five the total estimated picketing interns. With the threat of some two hundred nurses joining the strike, Rabinovitch resigned.
Publication
Globe. Revue internationale d’études québécoises
Volume
Vol. 18
Issue
no. 1
Pages
153-168
Date
2015
Language
fr
Citation
Robinson, Ira. “’Maîtres chez eux’ : La grève des internes de 1934 revisitée.” Globe. Revue internationale d’études québécoises Vol. 18, no. 1 (2015): 153–168.
Find in a library
Permalink