‘No French, no more’: Language-Based Exclusion in North America's First Professional Accounting Association, 1879–1927

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
‘No French, no more’: Language-Based Exclusion in North America's First Professional Accounting Association, 1879–1927
Abstract
The authors discuss the overrepresentation of Anglophone accountants vis-à-vis Francophone 'comptables' in the formative years of North America's first professional accounting association. On July 24, 1880, the Quebec government granted a charter to The Association of Accountants in Montreal, making it the first professional accounting associating in North America. The authors argue that in a linguistic market, where English was taken for granted as the official language of commerce, the founding members of the Association of Accountants in Montreal possessed a 'distinctive' cultural and linguistic habitus. They observe that the Association of Accountants in Montreal enacted for many years a number of exclusion strategies to effectively limit its admittance of Francophone 'compatibles' who possessed a different cultural and linguistic habitus. They maintain that when the Association of Accountants in Montreal eventually did explicitly embrace Francophone memberships, this was in order to counter the threat of a rival accounting designation. The first Francophone president of the Association of Accountants in Montreal was Alfred Cinq-Mars, elected to that position in 1905. The Association of Accountants in Montreal is today known as the Ordre des comptables agréés du Québec.
Publication
Accounting History Review
Volume
Vol. 21
Issue
no. 2
Pages
163-184
Date
2011
Language
en
Citation
Spence, Crawford, and Marion Brivot. “‘No French, No More’: Language-Based Exclusion in North America’s First Professional Accounting Association, 1879–1927.” Accounting History Review Vol. 21, no. 2 (2011): 163–184.
Find in a library
Permalink