Cloudberry Connections: Wilderness and Development on the Lower North Shore of Québec

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Cloudberry Connections: Wilderness and Development on the Lower North Shore of Québec
Abstract
Quebec's Lower North Shore consists of sixteen small English, French and Innu communities spread along 375 km of coastline. The author points out that prompted by the collapse of its cod-fishing industry in the 1990s, the region has turned to place-branding strategies to encourage wilderness tourism as a form of economic renewal. She examines "rubus chamaemorus," or the cloudberry, a local wild berry, as a contested cultural symbol in this process. The author analyzes how the cloudberry is being used as a symbol of wilderness and purity in current place-branding projects in the region, an image that perpetuates a frontier myth that the land is empty and available for privatization. She argues that a relational approach to the cloudberry challenges its representation as a fixed “object”, understanding it instead as a nexus of lived relations that include a range of practices such as walking, cooking and camping, and a host of competing interests such as Concordia University, Université du Québec, Lower North Shore development centres , as well as the Anglophone, Francophone and Innu communities.
Type
PhD dissertation
University
Concordia University
Place
Montreal
Date
2016
Language
en
Citation
Doonan, Natalie. “Cloudberry Connections: Wilderness and Development on the Lower North Shore of Québec.” PhD dissertation, Concordia University, 2016.
Find in a library
Permalink