Anglophone and Francophone Managers: Perceptions of Cultural Differences in Approaches to Work

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
Anglophone and Francophone Managers: Perceptions of Cultural Differences in Approaches to Work
Abstract
The authors examine the extent to which 600 Anglophone and 188 Francophone managers in a large corporation based in Quebec and Ontario believed that members of the two groups differed in their approach to and execution of their work in the 1980s. Francophone managers tended to perceive differences, whereas Anglophones showed a slight tendency to perceive similarities. Consistent with previous research, the authors argue that the Francophone managers who perceived differences expressed favorable attitudes toward the differentiating characteristics of their own group and those of Anglophones. In contrast, Anglophone managers who perceived differences evidenced a degree of ethnocentrism, viewing characteristics of their own group favorably and relatively downgrading those of Francophones. The ethnocentrism on the part of Anglophone managers was interpreted as reflecting a predictable response to what they perceive to be threatening changes in intergroup relations in Quebec.
Publication
Canadian Journal of Behavioral Science/Revue canadienne des sciences du comportement
Volume
Vol. 14
Issue
no. 2
Pages
144-151
Date
April 1982
Language
en
Citation
Taylor, Donald M., Lise M. Simard, David J. McKinan, and Jeanette Bellerose. “Anglophone and Francophone Managers: Perceptions of Cultural Differences in Approaches to Work.” Canadian Journal of Behavioral Science/Revue canadienne des sciences du comportement Vol. 14, no. 2 (April 1982): 144–151.
Find in a library
Permalink