A Deadly Discrimination Among Montreal Infants, 1860-1900

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
A Deadly Discrimination Among Montreal Infants, 1860-1900
Abstract
The authors show that there was no improvement in infant mortality in Montreal over the last half of the nineteenth century. The authors' research also reaffirms the importance of cultural community affiliation in infant mortality in the city. They argue that infant mortality can best be understood during this era as part of a larger demographic system, and the city's three cultural communities (French Catholic, Irish Catholic and British Protestant) exhibit very different demographic régimes. Infant mortality was forty-two percent higher among French Canadian babies than babies born to Irish Catholic or English-speaking Protestant parents.These differences show an interdependence between infant mortality, maternal health, age at marriage and the frequency and number of births.
Publication
Continuity and Change
Volume
Vol. 16
Issue
no. 1
Pages
95-135
Date
2001
Language
en
Citation
Thornton, Patricia, and Sherry Olson. “A Deadly Discrimination Among Montreal Infants, 1860-1900.” Continuity and Change Vol. 16, no. 1 (2001): 95–135.
Find in a library
Permalink