The Surrender of Montreal to General Amherst de Francis Hayman et l'identité impériale britannique

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
The Surrender of Montreal to General Amherst de Francis Hayman et l'identité impériale britannique
Abstract
The author examines a painting representing the 1760 victory of the British Empire over France in North America, namely "The Surrender of Montreal to General Amherst", by British painter Francis Hayman (1708-1776). The author describes the origins of this painting ordered by Jonathan Tyers, owner of London's Vauxhall, the recreational space where "The Surrender of Montreal" was exhibited, and to understand the meaning that it sought to convey to the British public regarding the events surrounding the fall of New France. The author argues that the painting sought to convey a strong message regarding the greatness of the British Empire, but it also sought to show that Britain had emerged as Europe's only truly great power; the only power able to govern colonial populations through the universal – and typically British – values of humanity, clemency, and charity. These values, he concludes, allowed Britain to impose and legitimise the "Pax Britannica" in North America.
Publication
Mens. Revue d’histoire intellectuelle de l’Amérique française
Volume
Vol. 12
Issue
no. 1
Pages
91-135
Date
Automne 2011
Language
fr
URL
Citation
Turcot, Laurent. “The Surrender of Montreal to General Amherst de Francis Hayman et l’identité impériale britannique.” Mens. Revue d’histoire intellectuelle de l’Amérique française Vol. 12, no. 1 (Automne 2011): 91–135. https://www.erudit.org/fr/revues/mens/2011-v12-n1-mens0146/1010567ar.pdf.
Find in a library
Permalink