James McGill and the Origin of His University

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
James McGill and the Origin of His University
Abstract
The Scottish-born Montreal fur trader James McGill (1744-1813) left at his death £10,000 and his Montreal Burnside estate of some 46 acres towards the endowment of a college or a university, specifying that the college or one of the colleges of the university should bear the name McGill. The Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning, the agency of the provincial government responsible for schools, was required to open the college or university on the Burnside site before the bequest became operative. It was not till 1821 that a charter was obtained and not till 1829 that teaching began in what is now McGill University. The author incorporated the reminiscences of William Henderson in this article, who, as a young man, had met James McGill.
Place
Montreal
Publisher
[s.n.]
Date
1870
Language
en
URL
Notes

Condensed from papers in Barnard's American Journal of Education, Vol. 13 (1859): 188-199; and The New Dominion Monthly, (March 1870): 37-40.

Citation
Dawson, John William. James McGill and the Origin of His University. Montreal: [s.n.], 1870. http://ebooks.library.ualberta.ca/local/cihm_23636.
Find in a library
Permalink