The Feminization of the Canadian Frontier: Engendering the ‘Peaceable Kingdom’ Myth in the Writings of Mary Anne Sadlier (1820-1913) & Isabella Valancy Crawford (1850-1887)

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
The Feminization of the Canadian Frontier: Engendering the ‘Peaceable Kingdom’ Myth in the Writings of Mary Anne Sadlier (1820-1913) & Isabella Valancy Crawford (1850-1887)
Abstract
The Irish-born Sadlier emigrated to Montreal in 1844, and remained in the city until 1860 when she moved to the United States. The author outlines the literary and personal influence that Thomas D’Arcy McGee had on Sadlier. In her autobiographical novel, Elinor Preston (1861), Sadlier describes her own plight, and that of Irish emigrants in Quebec, who had to choose between the predominantly Protestant English-speaking society of Montreal, and the religious succor but social alienation amongst the province’s French-speaking populace.
Publication
Canadian Journal of Irish Studies/Revue canadienne d’études irlandaises
Volume
Vol. 32
Issue
no. 1
Pages
46-55
Date
Spring 2006
Language
en
Citation
King, Jason. “The Feminization of the Canadian Frontier: Engendering the ‘Peaceable Kingdom’ Myth in the Writings of Mary Anne Sadlier (1820-1913) & Isabella Valancy Crawford (1850-1887).” Canadian Journal of Irish Studies/Revue canadienne d’études irlandaises Vol. 32, no. 1 (Spring 2006): 46–55.
Find in a library
Permalink