Imprinting Britain: Newspapers, Sociability, and the Shaping of British North America

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Imprinting Britain: Newspapers, Sociability, and the Shaping of British North America
Abstract
Printing presses were instrumental in creating and upholding a sense of community during the eighteenth century. The author explores the dynamic and interrelated world of newspapers, coffee houses, and theatre in the British imperial capitals of Quebec City and Halifax. He describes how an English-language colonial community coalesced around the printed word, establishing public spaces for colonists to propose, debate, and define their visions of an ideal society. The author points out that a moderate discourse emerged in these two towns that rejected republicanism, favoured civic engagement, advocated liberty with propriety, extolled democracy under monarchy, promoted reason over superstition, and encouraged social criticism without revolution. He also points out that the press safeguarded against the uncertainties of colonial life by providing a steady stream of transatlantic news, literature, and fashion that helped construct a sense of Britishness in an environment rife with mixed loyalties.
Place
Montreal and Kingston
Publisher
McGill-Queen's University Press
Date
2015
Language
en
Notes

Based on the author's PhD dissertation titled: "A Colonial Print Ascendancy: The Domestic Press, Sociability and Elite Formation in Eighteenth-Century Halifax and Quebec City." Queen's University, 2010. vi-299p.

Citation
Eamon, Michael. Imprinting Britain: Newspapers, Sociability, and the Shaping of British North America. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015.
Find in a library
Permalink