Representing Twentieth Century Canadian Colonial Identity: The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE)

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Representing Twentieth Century Canadian Colonial Identity: The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE)
Abstract
The author points out that colonialism in twentieth century Canada operated as a totalizing discourse, administered not by the force of a colonizing power, but by the mimicry of descendants from the constructed British imperial centre. She argues that these Anglo-Celtic descendants built a colonial identity that in its ideal manifestation asserted universal dominance and control, demanding that all difference assimilate or cease to exist. The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE), a Canadian women's patriotic organization formed in Montreal in 1900 by Margaret Clark Murray, a journalist, philanthropist and wife of an influential McGill University professor, is used by the author to represent this colonial identity; a hegemonic process that was constantly changing, and produced in a recursive relationship to the threats and resistance that, at specific moments, challenged its composition. The author traces the historical/cultural geography of the IODE to reveal the shifting focus of Canadian identity from imperial space to national space. This shift, she maintains, was produced in a multiplicity of geographic locations that offer a complicated challenge to theories of 'public' and 'private', of masculine and feminine and the 'everyday' and the 'theoretical'.
Type
PhD dissertation
University
McGill University
Place
Montreal
Date
1996
Language
en
URL
Citation
Pickles, Catherine Gillian. “Representing Twentieth Century Canadian Colonial Identity: The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE).” PhD dissertation, McGill University, 1996. http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol1/QMM/TC-QMM-40227.pdf.
Find in a library
Permalink