Le télégraphe au XIXe siècle : The Victorian Internet au service des échanges diplomatiques canado-américains durant l'invasion fénienne de 1866 au Québec

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Le télégraphe au XIXe siècle : The Victorian Internet au service des échanges diplomatiques canado-américains durant l'invasion fénienne de 1866 au Québec
Abstract
In 1866, the Montreal Telegraph Company strung a telegraph line from the south shore of Montreal to Missisquoi County in the Eastern Townships. The line was established out of fear of an American military invasion of Canada. On June 7, 1866, an armed attack on Canada took place when Irish Americans belonging to the Fenian Brotherhood, most of whom were veterans of the U.S. Civil War, crossed into Canada at Cook's Corner (present-day Saint-Armand) and at neighbouring Eccles Hill (part of present-day Frelighsburg) without encountering any resistance. They sent up their camp at Pigeon Hill. When word of the advancement of the Canadian militia became known, most of the Fenians retreated back over the border to Vermont on June 10, 1866. Some sixteen Fenians were captured by the militia, some in Missisquoi County, some in Vermont. The author outlines the role that the telegraph played in diplomatic exchanges between Washington, Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto and London over both the Fenians' invasion of Canada, and the militia's incursion into the United States.
Publication
Histoire Québec
Volume
Vol. 21
Issue
no. 3
Pages
30-33
Date
2016
Language
fr
Citation
Busseau, Laurent. “Le télégraphe au XIXe siècle : The Victorian Internet au service des échanges diplomatiques canado-américains durant l’invasion fénienne de 1866 au Québec.” Histoire Québec Vol. 21, no. 3 (2016): 30–33.
Find in a library
Permalink