Wildlife, Conservation and Conflict in Quebec, 1840-1914

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Wildlife, Conservation and Conflict in Quebec, 1840-1914
Abstract
An examination of how the patrician culture of wildlife conservation in Quebec by its English-speaking elite from the mid-nineteenth century to the outbreak of the First World War was the product of a segment of society that sought actively and in broad terms to improve the world in which they lived and ultimately gave the wildlife conservation movement its unique form within the province. The English-speaking elite based its wildlife strategies on traditional systems of European land tenure and estate management. It was their longstanding belief in progress, improvement, and social order that underpinned the development of their wildlife conservation strategies. The author traces the emergence of Quebec's lease-based regulatory system that blended elite forms of sport and conservation. Applied first to prized salmon rivers, this system came to encompass the bulk of Quebec's hunting and fishing territories, and effectively privatized Quebec's fish and game resources, often to the detriment of commercial and subsistence hunters and fishers.
Place
Vancouver, BC
Publisher
UBC Press
Date
2013
Language
en
Citation
Ingram, Darcy. Wildlife, Conservation and Conflict in Quebec, 1840-1914. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press, 2013.
Find in a library
Permalink