The Province of Quebec and the Early American Revolution. A Study in English-American Colonial History

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
The Province of Quebec and the Early American Revolution. A Study in English-American Colonial History
Abstract
Dealing mainly with the Quebec Act of 1774 and its effects on Britain's thirteen southern colonies, the author includes references to English-French relations in Quebec following the Conquest. Among its provisions, the Quebec Act guaranteed free practice of the Catholic faith in the province, replaced the oath of allegiance with one that no longer made reference to the Protestant faith, restored the use of the French civil law for private matters while maintaining the use of the English common law for public administration, including criminal prosecution, and restored the Catholic Church's right to impose tithes. The act became one of the so-called "Intolerable Acts" in the southern colonies that lead to the American Revolution because its also limited opportunities for those colonies to expand their western frontiers, by granting most of the Ohio Valley to the province of Quebec.
Series
Vol. 1, no. 3 of the Economics, Political Science, and History series of the University of Wisconsin, 1896.
Place
Madison, WI
Publisher
University of Wisconsin
Date
1896
Language
en
Citation
Coffin, Victor. The Province of Quebec and the Early American Revolution. A Study in English-American Colonial History. Vol. 1, no. 3 of the Economics, Political Science, and History series of the University of Wisconsin, 1896. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, 1896.
Find in a library
Permalink