Re-Presenting Diasporic Difference: Images of Immigrant Women by Canadian Women Artists, 1912-1935

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Re-Presenting Diasporic Difference: Images of Immigrant Women by Canadian Women Artists, 1912-1935
Abstract
In the early decades of twentieth century Canada, many middle- and upper-class English-speaking women social reformers helped shape Canadian immigration policy. The author points out that discourses on single immigrant women competed and clashed, converging upon Canadian women's images of immigrant women. These images are located at the interstices of opposing discourses that, on one hand, demanded single immigrant women work in order to alleviate the shortage of domestic workers in middle- and upper-class homes while, on the other hand, targeting the single immigrant woman as a potentially corruptive and destabilizing addition to Canadian society. By examining selected paintings, drawings, and sculptures of immigrant women, the author explores how these artistic representations both challenged and supported eugenic ideologies and how in some cases artistic production intervened in Canada's racist immigration policies. Among the artistic works examined by the author are those of Montreal painters Regina Seiden (1897-1991) and Prudence Heward (1896-1947).
Type
Master's thesis
University
Concordia University
Place
Montreal
Date
1999
Language
en
URL
Citation
Adley, Allyson Sarah. “Re-Presenting Diasporic Difference: Images of Immigrant Women by Canadian Women Artists, 1912-1935.” Master’s thesis, Concordia University, 1999. http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/obj/s4/f2/dsk3/ftp04/mq39122.pdf.
Find in a library
Permalink