L'ordre des choses : cabinets et musées d'histoire naturelle au Québec (1824-1900)

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
L'ordre des choses : cabinets et musées d'histoire naturelle au Québec (1824-1900)
Abstract
Throughout the nineteenth century, natural history museums proliferated in Quebec. The authors point out that the popularity of such museums was a consequence of the popularity of natural history itself, as a form of diversion among the middle-class. It was linked also to the teaching of the various branches of the discipline at the colleges and universities of the province. Examining such learned societies as the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec and the Natural History Society of Montreal, and natural history museums such as the Redpath Museum at McGill University and Montreal's Del Vecchio Museum, the authors show that the popularity of natural history had more to do with social and cultural trends than with the professionalization of science. In this respect, they argue, the "museum movement" in Quebec did not separate itself from what was observed in the rest of the world at the time.
Publication
Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française
Volume
Vol. 44
Issue
no. 1
Pages
3-30
Date
Été 1990
Language
fr
Citation
Duchesne, Raymond, and Paul Carle. “L’ordre des choses : cabinets et musées d’histoire naturelle au Québec (1824-1900).” Revue d’histoire de l’Amérique française Vol. 44, no. 1 (t 1990): 3–30.
Find in a library
Permalink