Death, Burial, and Protestant Identity in an Elite Family: The Montreal McCords

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
Death, Burial, and Protestant Identity in an Elite Family: The Montreal McCords
Abstract
The author points out that Mount Royal Cemetery was explicitly created as a Protestant cultural, social and religious space. Focusing on a prominent Montreal Protestant family over four generations and its association with Mount Royal Cemetery, both as presidents and trustees of the cemetery and later as occupants of its grounds, he examines the attitudes of Montreal’s Protestant elite to death, burial and identity. The McCords were Ulster Scots who arrived in Quebec as provisioners for the British troops during the Conquest. Their association with the Mount Royal Cemetery was from its founding in 1852 to the twentieth century.
Book Title
Negotiating Identities in 19th- and 20th-Century Montreal
Place
Vancouver, BC
Publisher
UBC Press
Date
2005
Pages
101-119
Language
en
Citation
Young, Brian. “Death, Burial, and Protestant Identity in an Elite Family: The Montreal McCords.” In Negotiating Identities in 19th- and 20th-Century Montreal, edited by Bettina Bradbury and Tamara Myers, 101–119. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press, 2005.
Find in a library
Permalink