The Religious Claim on Babies in Nineteenth-Century Montreal

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
The Religious Claim on Babies in Nineteenth-Century Montreal
Abstract
The authors' studies of infants and their families in nineteenth-century Montreal determined that cultural community played a more powerful role in infant mortality than economic factors and population density. Francophone Catholic babies were a third more likely to die than either Anglophone (Irish) Catholic infants or Anglophone (English or Scots) Protestant infants. The authors examine the different ways that Anglophone Catholics, most of whom were of the same economic class as Francophone Catholics, differed from the latter, and at times statistically resembled the Anglophone Protestant population.
Book Title
Religion and the Decline of Fertility in the Western World
Place
Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher
Springer
Date
2006
Pages
207-233
Language
en
Citation
Thornton, Patricia, and Sherry Olson. “The Religious Claim on Babies in Nineteenth-Century Montreal.” In Religion and the Decline of Fertility in the Western World, edited by Renzo Derosas and Frans van Poppel, 207–233. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer, 2006.
Find in a library
Permalink