Le Congrès juif canadien et l’hostilité à l’immigration juive dans l’immédiat après-guerre (1945-1948)

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Le Congrès juif canadien et l’hostilité à l’immigration juive dans l’immédiat après-guerre (1945-1948)
Abstract
The author points out that Canada's migration policy in the 1930s and 1940s was the most restrictive and selective in Canadian history, not least because of its hostility towards Jewish migrant populations. The question of anti-Semitism in Canada and Quebec can not therefore be asked without going back to Ottawa's position on immigration. The author examines not only the manifestations of this hostility, but the way in which it was perceived and opposed between 1945 and 1948 by the Montreal-based Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC), then the main national organization of the country's Jewish community. The author examines what understanding the CJC really had of the hostility of public opinion and the discriminatory mechanisms of Canadian migration policy, and how this perception shaped the CJC strategy against anti-Semitism and hostility to Jewish immigration and its relationship with the Liberal government of Mackenzie King government. The author offers a detailed analysis of the work of the CJC's key executives on this issue to better understand its relations with the press and, more importantly, its relations with a government, and bureaucracy, hostile to the entry of Jewish immigrants into Canada.
Publication
Globe. Revue internationale d’études québécoises
Volume
Vol. 18
Issue
no. 1
Pages
111-130
Date
2015
Language
fr
Citation
Bugard, Antoine. “Le Congrès juif canadien et l’hostilité à l’immigration juive dans l’immédiat après-guerre (1945-1948).” Globe. Revue internationale d’études québécoises Vol. 18, no. 1 (2015): 111–130.
Find in a library
Permalink