The Carricks of Whitehaven: Irish Famine Dinnsheanchas in the New World

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
The Carricks of Whitehaven: Irish Famine Dinnsheanchas in the New World
Abstract
The story of the Kavanaghs of Cap-des-Rosier on Quebec's Gaspé coast, whose great-great-grand-parents, Patrick Kaveney and Sarah McDonald and their son Martin, survived the wreakage of the coffin ship "Carricks of Whitehaven" when it sank off Cap-des-Rosier on April 28, 1847. Five daughters of Patrick and Sarah did not survive. Of the 183 who left Sligo, Ireland, only 48 survived the sinking of the Carricks. The author points out that the topography of this disaster, its place lore and memoirs has been preserved assiduously by the Kavanaghs for 169 years. In 1900, St. Patrick’s parish in Montreal raised a monument on the site. six children (five daughters aged between two and ten, and a twelve-year-old son) ,
Book Title
Landscape Values: Place and Praxis
Place
Galway, Ireland
Publisher
Centre for Landscape Studies, National University of Ireland Galway
Date
2016
Pages
240-243
Language
en
URL
Citation
Ó hAllmhuráin, Gearóid. “The Carricks of Whitehaven: Irish Famine Dinnsheanchas in the New World.” In Landscape Values: Place and Praxis, edited by Tim Collins, Gesche Kindermann, Conor Newman, and Nessa Cronin, 240–243. Galway, Ireland: Centre for Landscape Studies, National University of Ireland Galway, 2016. https://aran.library.nuigalway.ie/handle/10379/7340.
Find in a library
Permalink