The Charter of the French Language : Instrument of Unilingualism or Bilingualism?

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
The Charter of the French Language : Instrument of Unilingualism or Bilingualism?
Abstract
The author notes that Bill 101 led to positive changes, including increased bilingualism among Anglophones and equality of incomes among the language groups. He contends that while challenges remain, both languages are flourishing, and the tensions of the 1970s have largely disappeared. The author argues that official unilingualism with French as the only official language and the legislative promotion of French are absolutely necessary to preserve French, given its frail position across the world and the traditional anglicization of immigrants in Quebec. However, he points out, English is not and should not become a foreign language in Quebec. It is, rather, part of the heritage of Quebec in general and will always continue to play an important role in the life of Quebec, especially in Montreal. Looking ahead, the author proposes an alternative school system that would increase bilingualism in a Quebec where French is the common language most of the time. Under this approach, the purpose is not unilingualism, but rather the maintaining of a great degree of bilingualism in general.
Book Title
La Charte : La loi 101 et les Québécois d’expression anglaise / The Charter : Bill 101 and English-Speaking Quebec
Place
Québec
Publisher
Presses de l’Université Laval
Date
2021
Pages
453-461
Language
en
ISBN
978-2-7637-5436-9
Citation
Grey, Julius. “The Charter of the French Language : Instrument of Unilingualism or Bilingualism?” In La Charte : La Loi 101 et Les Québécois d’expression Anglaise / The Charter : Bill 101 and English-Speaking Quebec, edited by Lorraine O’Donnell, Patrick Donovan, and Brian Lewis, 453–461. Québec: Presses de l’Université Laval, 2021.
Find in a library
Permalink