Judicial Interpretation of the Charter of the French Language : Collective Rights Versus Individual Liberties

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
Judicial Interpretation of the Charter of the French Language : Collective Rights Versus Individual Liberties
Abstract
The author tackles the judicial interpretation of the Charter of the French Language, notably by the Supreme Court of Canada, and the effects of the resulting jurisprudence on Quebec’s English-speaking communities. He explores one of the understressed consequences of Bill 101, that is, the triumph of collective rights over individual liberties and whether or not the notion of collective rights extends to Quebec’s English-speaking minority. The methodology used by the author is the legal interpretation and analysis of the judicial consideration of the Charter of the French Language and notably the application of the concepts of collective rights in opposition to individual liberties. These outcomes are then assessed in relation to the legal rights of Quebec’s English-speaking communities in the use of the English language in Quebec. The author examines whether or not an argument could be made that Quebec’s English-speaking communities have collective rights which must be balanced against the collective rights of the French-speaking majority.
Book Title
La Charte : La loi 101 et les Québécois d’expression anglaise / The Charter : Bill 101 and English-Speaking Quebec
Place
Québec
Publisher
Presses de l’Université Laval
Date
2021
Pages
173-189
Language
en
ISBN
978-2-7637-5436-9
Citation
Bergman, Michael. “Judicial Interpretation of the Charter of the French Language : Collective Rights Versus Individual Liberties.” In La Charte : La Loi 101 et Les Québécois d’expression Anglaise / The Charter : Bill 101 and English-Speaking Quebec, edited by Lorraine O’Donnell, Patrick Donovan, and Brian Lewis, 173–189. Québec: Presses de l’Université Laval, 2021.
Find in a library
Permalink