Different Visions: The Multiplication of Protestant Missions to French-Canadian Roman Catholics, 1834-1855

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
Different Visions: The Multiplication of Protestant Missions to French-Canadian Roman Catholics, 1834-1855
Abstract
The French Canadian Missionary Society, a multi-denominational evangelical organization, was established in 1839 in Montreal by Anglo-Protestant Quebecers. The society was opposed by George Jehoshaphat Mountain, Anglican Bishop of Quebec, who regarded it as an organization of zealots that would retard rather than advance the Protestant cause. Mountain supported a moderate approach, promoting efforts to develop literacy and educational programs among French Canadians, but avoiding confrontations with Catholics over religious issues. The Church of England supported Mountain's methods.
Book Title
Canadian Protestant and Catholic Missions, 1820s-1960s
Place
New York, NY
Publisher
Peter Land
Date
1988
Pages
49-73
Language
en
Citation
Black, Robert Merrill. “Different Visions: The Multiplication of Protestant Missions to French-Canadian Roman Catholics, 1834-1855.” In Canadian Protestant and Catholic Missions, 1820s-1960s, edited by John S. Moir and C. T. McIntire, 49–73. New York, NY: Peter Land, 1988.
Find in a library
Permalink