The Fenians in Montreal, 1862-68: Invasion, Intrigue and Assassination

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
The Fenians in Montreal, 1862-68: Invasion, Intrigue and Assassination
Abstract
In 1866, roughly one in eight Montrealers had been born in Ireland. As an ethnic group, the Irish constituted around a quarter of the city's population, with Catholics in the majority, and the Fenians of Montreal were considered among the most militant Irish revolutionaries on the continent. Some post-Civil War American Irish thought that one way of liberating Ireland from British rule was to capture the British North American colonies, starting with Canada East, and use Canada as a base from which to attack British shipping. They thought that Canada could even serve as a bargaining chip in negotiations for an independent Ireland. The author outlines how the Fenians in Montreal grew out of, and broke away from, the city's St. Patrick's Society.
Publication
Erie/Ireland: A Journal of Irish Studies
Volume
Vol. 38
Issue
no. 3-4
Pages
109-133
Date
Fall-Winter 2003
Language
en
Citation
Wilson, David A. “The Fenians in Montreal, 1862-68: Invasion, Intrigue and Assassination.” Erie/Ireland: A Journal of Irish Studies Vol. 38, no. 3–4 (Fall-Winter 2003): 109–133.
Find in a library
Permalink