Normative Influence and Rational Conflict Decisions: Group Norms and Cost-Benefit Analyses for Intergroup Behavior

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
Normative Influence and Rational Conflict Decisions: Group Norms and Cost-Benefit Analyses for Intergroup Behavior
Abstract
The authors outline a model in which ingroup and outgroup norms inform 'rational' decision-making (cost-benefit analysis) for conflict behaviors. Norms influence perceptions of the consequences of the behavior, and individuals may thus strategically conform to or violate norms in order to acquire benefits and avoid costs. The authors examine two studies to demonstrate these processes in the context of conflict in Quebec. In the first study, Anglophones' perceptions of Francophone and Anglophone norms for pro-English behaviors predicted evaluations of the benefits and costs of the behaviors, and these cost-benefit evaluations in turn mediated the norm-intention links for both group norms. In the second study, a manipulated focus on supportive versus hostile ingroup and outgroup norms also predicted cost-benefit evaluations, which mediated the norm-intention relationships. The authors conclude that the studies support a model of strategic conflict choices in which group norms inform, rather than suppress, rational expectancy-value processes.
Publication
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
Volume
Vol. 8
Issue
no. 4
Pages
355-374
Date
October 2005
Language
en
Citation
Louis, Winnifred R., Doinald M. Taylor, and Rebecca L. Douglas. “Normative Influence and Rational Conflict Decisions: Group Norms and Cost-Benefit Analyses for Intergroup Behavior.” Group Processes & Intergroup Relations Vol. 8, no. 4 (October 2005): 355–374.
Find in a library
Permalink