Quebec’s Politics of Language: Uncommonly Restrictive Regime or Ill-Repute Undeserved?

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Quebec’s Politics of Language: Uncommonly Restrictive Regime or Ill-Repute Undeserved?
Abstract
The author examines the reasons behind the criticism and negative reactions with which Quebec's Charter of the French Language (Bill 101) is frequently met both inside and outside Canada. The author gives an overview of Quebec's language regulations, presenting them both in historical and contemporary contexts. His analysis is focused on three areas where the influence of Quebec's language law is most evident and, at the same time, most fervently debated, i.e. in business and commercial signage, in legislation and public administration, and in education. Quebec's linguistic regulations are presented in a wider context of the language laws adopted by other Canadian provinces and by the federal level. His aim in such a comparative study of Canadian language regimes is to examine: a) whether the criticism and ridicule that Quebec often receives for its language policy is deserved and justified, b) whether Quebec's language law is indeed so uncommonly restrictive by Canadian standards and practice. The author also evaluates the relevance and effectiveness of the Quebec language policy.
Publication
TransCanadiana
Volume
Vol. 7
Pages
151-174
Date
2014/2015
Language
en
Citation
Soroka, Tomasz. “Quebec’s Politics of Language: Uncommonly Restrictive Regime or Ill-Repute Undeserved?” TransCanadiana Vol. 7 (2015 2014): 151–174.
Find in a library
Permalink