High Ground: The Early History of Mount Royal. Part III: Romancing the Rock

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
High Ground: The Early History of Mount Royal. Part III: Romancing the Rock
Abstract
By the 1850s, the English-speaking Montreal Protestant elite adopted the Victorian preference for Romanticism as evidenced by the movement to create a "rural cemetery" on the northern slopes of Mount Royal. The Protestant cemetery was designed by landscaper James Sidney of Philadelphia in 1852. Montreal's Jewish community decided in the mid-1850s to establish a separate burial grounds on Mount Royal, adjacent to the Protestant cemetery, and in 1854 the fabrique of the Montreal Catholic parish of Notre Dame acquired land for Notre Dame-des-Neiges Cemetery on the north-western slope of the mountain. Meanwhile, McGill University was developing and expanding on the slopes of Mount Royal under the leadership of Principal John William Dawson and, by the early 1860s, mansions and gardens by some of the city's elite Anglo-Protestant families were being built around the McTavish Reservoir, built to conform to the Romantic ideal amid scenic rocks and trees and accessible by boardwalks, railings and lamps for the well-to-do to take the air in a spot with a stunning view of the city.
Publication
Quebec Heritage News
Volume
Vol. 5
Issue
no. 10
Pages
18-22
Date
July-August 2010
Language
en
Citation
MacLeod, Rod. “High Ground: The Early History of Mount Royal. Part III: Romancing the Rock.” Quebec Heritage News Vol. 5, no. 10 (August 2010): 18–22.
Find in a library
Permalink