Maternalism and the Homeopathic Mission in Late-Victorian Montreal

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Maternalism and the Homeopathic Mission in Late-Victorian Montreal
Abstract
The author examines the interaction between homeopathy and material values by examining the Montreal Homeopathic Hospital, which opened in 1894. Through an analysis of women's diverse roles within the institution, it demonstrates the variety of ways in which maternalism found expression. She argues that the maternal ideology was particularly compatible with homeopathy’s self-proclaimed mission to the poor, the emphasis it placed upon inculcating familial values within the homeopathic community, its appeal to women as patients, its claim to reduce child mortality, and the image it cultivated of the special role of the homeopathic mother. In 1951, the Montreal Homeopathic Hospital changed its name to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. In 1996 the hospital became a not-for-profit ambulatory health care centre.
Publication
Canadian Bulletin of Medical History/Bulletin canadien d’histoire de la médecine
Volume
vol. 16
Issue
no. 2
Pages
293-315
Date
1999
Language
en
Citation
Jasen, Patricia. “Maternalism and the Homeopathic Mission in Late-Victorian Montreal.” Canadian Bulletin of Medical History/Bulletin canadien d’histoire de la médecine 16, no. 2 (1999): 293–315.
Find in a library
Permalink