Downhome from Ulster: Ulster Irish Immigration to the Eastern Townships of Quebec and the Development of Irish Ethnic Identity, 1814-1850

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Downhome from Ulster: Ulster Irish Immigration to the Eastern Townships of Quebec and the Development of Irish Ethnic Identity, 1814-1850
Abstract
An examination of how and why the Ulster Irish in the Eastern Townships constructed an ethnic identity that helped them negotiate the immigrant's world of nineteenth century Quebec. The author explores several key concepts: the immigration and settlement process within the framework of white settler society, the role of religion and language in the construction of ethnic identity, the implications of pre- and post-migration class differences, the importance of Irish and Canadian nationalist projects and the impact of living in the U.S.-Canadian borderlands, all within the context of the British-French dialectic. She also examines how the Ulster Irish constructed multiple identities: political, economic, provincial, township, religious and national, although these identities were not invoked uniformly within the group or by any one member all the time, but were products of a complex configuration of economic, political and historical relations.
Type
PhD dissertation
University
University of California, Santa Cruz
Place
Santa Cruz, CA
Date
2005
Language
en
Citation
Simonton, Kathleen Ruth. “Downhome from Ulster: Ulster Irish Immigration to the Eastern Townships of Quebec and the Development of Irish Ethnic Identity, 1814-1850.” PhD dissertation, University of California, Santa Cruz, 2005.
Find in a library
Permalink