Manly Smokes: Tobacco Consumption and the Construction of Identities in Industrial Montreal

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Manly Smokes: Tobacco Consumption and the Construction of Identities in Industrial Montreal
Abstract
An exploration of the cultural practice of smoking and its connection to social relations in Montreal from the beginning of mass production in 1888 to the First World War. The author uncovers the norms of smoking etiquette and taste, their roots in gender, class and race relations and their use in reproducing these power relationships. He argues that these prescriptions reflected and served to legitimize beliefs about inclusion, exclusion and hierarchy that were at the core of nineteenth century liberalism. The author points out that liberal ideals of self-control and rationality structured the ritual of smoking: from the purchase of tobacco; to who was to smoke; to how one was supposed to smoke; to where one smoked. These prescriptions served to normalize the exclusion of women from the definition of the liberal individual and to justify the subordination of the poor and cultural minorities.
Type
PhD dissertation
University
McGill University
Place
Montreal
Date
2001
Language
en
URL
Citation
Rudy, Jarrett. “Manly Smokes: Tobacco Consumption and the Construction of Identities in Industrial Montreal.” PhD dissertation, McGill University, 2001. http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol1/QMM/TC-QMM-37910.pdf.
Find in a library
Permalink