Ruling By Schooling Quebec: Conquest to Liberal Governmentality - A Historical Sociology

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
Ruling By Schooling Quebec: Conquest to Liberal Governmentality - A Historical Sociology
Abstract
The author provides a detailed account of colonial politics from 1760 to 1841 by following repeated attempts to school the Quebec French-speaking citizens. He shows that although attempts to govern the province by educating its population consumed huge amounts of public money, it had little impact on rural ignorance: while near-universal literacy reigned in English Quebec and neighbouring New England by the 1820s, at best one in three French-speaking peasant men in Quebec could sign his name in the insurrectionary decade of the 1830s. The author also shows how imperial attempts to govern a tumultuous colony propelled the early development of Canadian social science. He argues for a revisionist account of the pioneering investigations of Lord Gosford and Lord Durham.
Place
Toronto, ON
Publisher
University of Toronto Press
Date
2012
# of Pages
x-563p.
Language
en
ISBN
978-1-4426-1049-1
Citation
Curtis, Bruce. Ruling By Schooling Quebec: Conquest to Liberal Governmentality - A Historical Sociology. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press, 2012.
Find in a library
Permalink