'Very Picturesque and Very Canadian': The Blanket Coat and Anglo-Canadian Identity in the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
'Very Picturesque and Very Canadian': The Blanket Coat and Anglo-Canadian Identity in the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century
Abstract
According to the author, during the latter half of the nineteenth century, one garment was readily identified as a Canadian costume -- the blanket coat. The author examines Anglo-Canadian use of the blanket coat during this period, especially its link to Anglo-Montreal elite's development of the sport of snowshoeing, and she explores the reasons why the coat came to be viewed as representative of Canadian identity. She also survey's the coat's depiction in photographs taken at the Montreal studio of William Notman from 1860 to 1900. There are over 450 photographs in the Notman archive with the sitter wearing a blanket coat.
Book Title
Fashion: A Canadian Perspective
Place
Toronto, ON
Publisher
University of Toronto Press
Date
2004
Pages
17-40
Language
en
Citation
Stack, Eileen. “‘Very Picturesque and Very Canadian’: The Blanket Coat and Anglo-Canadian Identity in the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century.” In Fashion: A Canadian Perspective, edited by Alexandra Palmer, 17–40. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press, 2004.
Find in a library
Permalink