The Death of Whiggery : Lower Canadian British Constitutionalism and the ‘Tentation de l’histoire paralelle’

Type of resource
Author/collaborator
Title
The Death of Whiggery : Lower Canadian British Constitutionalism and the ‘Tentation de l’histoire paralelle’
Abstract
The author argues that the Constitution Act of 1791 was meant to create in Lower Canada the eighteenth century British Whig values of “Liberty and Property”. For the English-speaking Lower Canadian elite, these Whig values formed a coherent framework that made legitimate their conflict with the French-Canadian majority for control over politics. The attachment to ‘Whiggery’ ended after the 1840s, not as a result of the emergence of responsible government in Canada but, according to the author, because English-speaking Lower Canadians responded to parallel changes in British political society.
Publication
Journal of the Canadian Historical Association/Revue de la Société historique du Canada
Volume
(New Series) Vol. 2
Pages
195-213
Date
1991
Language
en
Citation
McCulloch, Michael. “The Death of Whiggery : Lower Canadian British Constitutionalism and the ‘Tentation de l’Histoire Paralelle’.” Journal of the Canadian Historical Association/Revue de la Société historique du Canada (New Series) Vol. 2 (1991): 195–213.
Find in a library
Permalink