Bill 101 as God and Demon : The Charter of the French Language and English Canada

Type of resource
Authors/collaborators
Title
Bill 101 as God and Demon : The Charter of the French Language and English Canada
Abstract
The author notes that the Charter of the French Language, or Bill 101, has had a deep and unappreciated impact on Canada’s constitution and on English Canadian culture, specifically with regard to their relationship to language and rights. First, he points out, Bill 101 set the conditions for a more substantive duality between English and French in Canada, instead of the mere formal equality that was apparent in documents like the Official Languages Act of 1969. Secondly, Bill 101’s philosophy of founding language rights on a collective rather than individual basis was an important shift in the constitutional discourse. Finally, the author argues that Bill 101 came to represent a second “model” of language protection regimes, one that guaranteed predominance of one language over others in order to safeguard language survival.
Book Title
La Charte : La loi 101 et les Québécois d’expression anglaise / The Charter : Bill 101 and English-Speaking Quebec
Place
Québec
Publisher
Presses de l’Université Laval
Date
2021
Pages
127-144
Language
en
ISBN
978-2-7637-5436-9
Citation
McDougall, Andrew. “Bill 101 as God and Demon : The Charter of the French Language and English Canada.” In La Charte : La Loi 101 et Les Québécois d’expression Anglaise / The Charter : Bill 101 and English-Speaking Quebec, edited by Lorraine O’Donnell, Patrick Donovan, and Brian Lewis, 127–144. Québec: Presses de l’Université Laval, 2021.
Find in a library
Permalink